ADVANCE ON MEXICO CITY RESUMES

From:
ONE HUNDRED YEARS WITH THE SECOND CAVALRY
By Joseph I. Lambert, Major, Second Cavalry
Copyright 1939 Commanding Officer, Second Cavalry, Fort Riley, Kansas
Capper Printing Company, Inc.

It had been impossible for General Scott to advance upon Mexico City with his depleted force early in the summer when the Mexican army was disorganized. Now that he had obtained enough troops to proceed, Santa Anna had been busy reorganizing his army also until the defenses around the capital contained about 35,000 men. When the American army left Puebla August 7, the Second Dragoons were well represented by the advance. The division of General Twiggs, the former regimental commander, and the cavalry brigade of Colonel Harney, the regimental commander, led the way. The regiment was commanded by Major Sumner and formed a part of the cavalry brigade. The column reached Ayotla August 10, within a few miles of the Mexican outer defenses, and remained here several days doing reconnaissance duty.

The Second acted as escort for the officers making some of these reconnaissances. One of the officers on this duty on August 12 was Captain Robert E. Lee, escorted by Companies F and I. They moved so close to the mountain, El Penon, that conversation was carried on with the defenders. It was found the mountain was defended by 7,000 men and could be captured with a probable loss of 3,000 men. Two companies of the regiment also escorted General Smith, who made a daring reconnaissance of the next important enemy position six miles to the left of El Penon. It was finally decided to attack the city from the south by the Chalco route.

The regiment led the advance by this route south of the two lakes and entered San Augustin August 17. Company A, under Blake, was advance guard and took possession of the town after a brief skirmish. The next day Company F led off as advance guard with Captain Thornton commanding. As they approached San Antonio, Captain Thornton was struck by a cannon ball from the outer defenses and instantly killed. It was he who was captured with most of his squadron opposite Matamoras in the first encounter with the Mexicans and actually brought on the war.

72 Replies to “ADVANCE ON MEXICO CITY RESUMES”

  1. Good luck and good hunting, if it comes to that. I haven’t kept up with the going-on of the 2nd since I left long ago, but my heart, prayers, and thoughts are with the Regiment.

    Like

  2. As our forefathers and fellow troopers have done before, the troopers of the Second have been called upon to defend their country. It is with heartfelt wishes that each of them go forward and " “Remember your Regiment and follow your officers."

    Godspeed and a safe journey to each of you, as you write the next chapter in the great and proud history of the Second Armored Cavalry!

    CPT Ed Luzadder

    Like

  3. I know what you guys are going through right now, and my thoughts are with you. I can recall that moment in November ’90, when they interupted regularly scheduled programming to show the news conference with Sec. Cheney. Standing in the day-room at Camp Hof shooting pool with a few of my buddies, I couldn’t believe what I was hearing. I only wish we could have finished the job when we had Saddam’s balls in a vice the first time. We’re all pulling for you, no matter what the leftists in the press say. God be with you!

    Like

  4. Good luck and God Speed…great to see that, even with no tanks or bradleys, we are still respected enought to be called up. Let hope they live up to the high standard we set in the 1st Gulf War.

    Like

  5. I had the extreme privledge in seeing one my graduated youth (I am a Youth Pastor) walk up my driveway in Navy blues, just home from boot camp. The privledge is the ability to speak into the lives of young men and women like "Robert" to do the right thing no matter the difficulties. Also I am serving as a local draft board member (Selective Service). Toujours Pret

    Like

  6. How one served and continues to serve is a great question. I am currently a Veterans Services Representative with a VA Regional Office, and I assist veterans with their claims. I am also the S-4 of a Field Artillery Battalion in the WVARNG.

    Our President has asked us to serve in our communities, and serving in our communities, either by volunteering with a service organization, or just checking on a neighbor from time to time is a great way to do a service for our country.

    God Bless The Second Cavalry, and The United States of America.

    CPT Ed Luzadder
    S-4, WVARNG

    Like

  7. Dave,
    Your post is outstanding! It’s true Bro, being in the Cav instills a pride, and creates a brotherhood like no other unit can. It’s as much a "state of mind" as anything else.
    Espirit de Corps does not waiver in the Cav, never has, never will.
    Always Ready!
    Jeff
    (Twocavtroop)

    Like

  8. Santa had to be with 1/2 ACR out of Bindlach.
    Christensen Barracks was an old Luftwaffe base which allowed a runway for the sleigh. There was a hanger to take cover in during enclement weather, and the 27 levels (supposed) under the hanger allowed him to store his sleigh in the off season and take practice runs out of the side of ‘The Rock'(supposed launch opening)late at night to keep the Reindeer PT up without being noticed.
    Although it is rumor, it is said that Rudolph was working air traffic control at the airport across the training field. It appears he had a nose for guiding in planes and gliders when fog set in.
    I can also say that while running through the country side on my personal PT, I occassionally saw deer jumping into the corn fields ( to not blow there cover)obviously out working on their cardio.
    As for Santa’s belly, Maisel Hefe Weizen no doubt!

    Merry Christmas everyone.

    Cavdoc

    Like

  9. Isaac,
    My birthday is October 25th, so needless to say I have informed my fiancee’ of what I will get for condolences. lol…..
    Toujours Pret
    Twocavtroop

    Like

  10. Ok, I have searched this site you gave extensively and cannot find the oval red and white beret flash we wore back then. I lost my beret in a fire a few years back, still have the insiginias but need a flash to put on a beret for old time sake and veterans days etc.
    would appreciate any help I could get on this.
    thanks,
    Toujours pret!
    Jim White

    Like

  11. Good article, but with the advancement of war gaming from HPS (www.hpssims.com)and others, it a little behind the times. Take Fulda Gap-85, by John Tiller that features:

    – One mile hexes and three hour turns.

    – Company and battalion-sized units.

    – Infantry, armor, helicopter, airborne, artillery, and special forces units.

    – Special rules for Chemical Warfare, Artillery-Delivered Mines,

    Electronic Warfare (including jamming and intelligence), and Thermal

    Imaging Sights.

    – Map is over 250 by 150 hexes from the Rhine River in the west to Leipzig

    in the east.

    – Over 20 scenarios ranging from a 10 turn scenario involving the 11th

    Armored Cavalry Regiment vs. the Warsaw Pact to a 160 turn campaign game

    involving American, West German, Canadian, Russian, East German, and

    Polish forces.

    Or "Decisive Action" by Jim Lunsford, not for the faint at heart, "is a modern Division and Corps level simulation that depicts combat with maneuver brigades and battalions along with supporting artillery, airstrikes, electronic warfare, engineer, helicopters, and even pysops units. Units are depicted with official NATO symbology, and US Army official map control measures delineate the battlefield. Scenarios include Germany, SouthWest Asia, and the US Army’s National Training Center."

    And there are more such genere at http://www.shrapnelgames.com.

    SSG Carruthers

    Like

  12. Guilty as charged.

    I do not consider myself to be one of the grizzled old-timers of the Army of old; by that I mean soldiers of the Vietnam era and on up until the late eighties and the end of the Cold War. I do not consider myself a new, soft soldier of this so-called Nintedo generation. I am the interim.

    I came into the Army when a boot to the back of the head from a Drill Seargent on a rifle range in basic training was being heavily frowned upon…but not unheard of. My first assignment was in Germany, and my first deployment was to the now-defunct border camps…I was also one of the last to do so. I did my time in SWA; not once, but three times…the most recent being just this past year.

    This is not to say that I was a ground ponder the entire time. I’ve worked (work) in direct support and combat support…working on air defense systems and now on helicopters. I’ve put my time in in training units as well.

    I have seen the good times…when money was plentiful, training lasted forever, and parts were plentiful. And I have seen the bad…working in a position intended for someone three ranks higher than my own, working by myself in an office intended for four people, and begging and pleading for more funds the entire time.

    My generation was considered the push-button Army, otherwise know as the CNN generation. Push a button, a projectile goes down range, and a computer does the rest. At least that is what the “old-timers” say about us.

    Always Ready, Det Cord!

    SGT Slo*****

    “Red_Rock” on Dragoon Base.

    Like

  13. Amen Brother. As one of the old timers you are talking about and a veteran of the Regiment I commend you and thank you for your continued service. I remember the days of old when support people worked just as many if not more long hours than us line guys, trying to maintain a Troop worth of vehicles just to keep them ready for immediate deployment. They did the time with us at the Border Camps for 6-8 weeks at a time.

    As for your drill instructors, I am sure they left a lasting impression that you will remember the rest of your life. I remember the day I got promoted to Sergeant, I was the at the Fort Carson personel section to get my ID card changed, and I ran into my old Drill Instructor. It was a completely differant meeting than 3 years earlier during the humid Fort Knox summer of 1982. He took me to the NCO club for my first time.

    Most of the “Old Timers” remember what it was like. We understand that the nobelist of all professions is also the one of the most difficult.

    Keep your head held high and proud. Us “Old Timers” and all of America are very proud of the young people who take up our noble profession.

    You remain in our thoughts and prayers every day.

    Robert Haynes

    Sergeant

    C Troop 1/2 ACR

    Bindlach, FRG

    1983-1984

    Like

  14. As I read the articles posted about this subject, I (as an old soldier/two-time veteran of the Regiment) can understand the point of view of the soldier and leader. I cannot speak of how the regiment pr the Army has changed, as my only experience has been at the Troop/Battery level, and some interactions with the Squadrons I belonged to at the time (C Trp 1/2 1985-1988 and HWB 3/2 1995-1998). I remeber when I went through OSUT at Fort Knox, and how difficult it was at the time. I have also seen the way some of the soldiers are treated today as I continue to visit Fort Knox about four times a year. The training these young soldiers receive is quite a bit different than the training we received in 1984. But, my training was different from that of a tanker or scout in 1941. Unless we place ourselves into that situation all over again, by that, I mean go through the training now, we really don’t know how it is in those training units, but we as leaders do see some of the results of that training. In seeing some of those results is where the stereotypes are formed. As a young Lieutenant, I was told by my battery commander (I am proude to say that I was an elisted tanker, and commissioned into the Field Artillery), “90% of your time will be spent dealing with 10% of your people.” This was true, as those soldiers were the ones we had to deal with on a daily basis. Could this possibly be where we realize training has failed somewhere for these individuals? If so, do we spread that opinion accross a whole generation of soldier? I don’t think so, but I have been guilty of it in the past. To you young soldier, I am sorry to have done that, as I know well the hard work you and others do to make the Regiment strong.As for the opinions of the leadership of the Regiment, I was there at the approximately the same time as the Platoon Sergeant, and within the Squadron, there were some problems. I went to Bosnia, the battery was far removed from the rest of the squadron, and in the four months I was in Bosnia (I too left the active military due to problems with the leadership), the Squadron Commander had to be ordered to visit the battery. He had not been to our unit since our arrival in country, and we had seen the Regimental Commander at least four times during that period. I can understand your frustrations with training, I too had those frustrations in trying to train a platoon of artillery to perform their missions without assistance from the post on down. I also remember the long road march to Fort Chaffee just to have land to train on. As long as the Regiment is used to augment the OPFOR, and JRTC has control over the land assets, training of the units will be a problem. I know this seems a bit disjointed, and I hope I have addressed most of the issues I wanted to cover. In closing, I know the spirit of the American Solder is such that it will rise to the occasion when called upon, just as we did on the Reaction Force at those now non-existant border camps of the Cold War, or the deserts of SWA. We are “One Army”, not an “Army of One”, and we must remember that each day. All soldiers (both young and old), on active duty or not, serve their country for different reasons. My reasons were initially for the college money, and now it is out of a sense of owing something to my contry for giving me the many opportunities I have had over the past 18 years. The reasons we serve do not really matter, but the service one gives to the country does matter. In a world such as the one we have today, I am happy to see our younger soldiers in uniform and protecting not only the right to write and think what we want, but the greatest nation on the face of this earth, The United States of America. God bless all of us serving today, and God Bless America.

    Ed Luzadder

    Like

  15. lookin for Greg Cataldo, ‘Cruity-J, Smitty, Fenstermaker. All platoon buddies from the Rock 1989-1992. If anyone has any idea, please e-mail me. Steve Hardin

    Like

  16. Are you able to post unit pictures such as those taken in Germany and framed? Most of mine are aged and fading but still can be scanned and emailed. If so, is it possible to design a “rogues” gallery of individuals who served at various periods of the Regiment’s history? Pictures are worth a thousand words.

    Like

  17. Got some great pictures to share with other 2nd Cav troops, like what happens to a fully combat loaded Sheridan when it explodes, border crossing through a starlight scope, lots of troop pictures from 74-75 of the Rock, Gates, Pitman, Bayreuth, even a few from the early 50’s when dad was 2nd Cav. How do I go about getting them on the web? I can be contacted at deddygetty1@attbi.com.

    Always Ready, Sir !!!

    Like

  18. Well, I guess I’m one of the grizzled veterans who has been bad mouthing the modern Army. I was A Scout with 14 years of service and was in K-trp during Desert Storm. After leaving Germany I went to Ft.Carson then to Korea. I then chose to return to the 2nd Cav and even back to K-trp. What a huge dissapointment. In the seven months I spent at Ft.Polk the Troop spent 2 days in the field, did not conduct training of any kind, and only did p.t. two, maybe three times a week. I suggested we actually train during sargeants time training and was met by looks of utter bewilderment. I had soldiers who wouldn’t show up for formation or would fall out of a run and disappear. I had soldiers who would would flat out disobey one lawful order after another and then couldn,t understand why I would be angry.

    Most of my Scouts couldn’t even perform basic Scout functions and showed no desire to learn.

    The blame lied squarely on the shoulders of the leadership. The Command Climate was so lax from Regiment down to the 1SG that it was no wonder the troops where lax as well. Every attemp at establishing discipline was met with a “Don’t worry about it” from the 1SG and CO.

    When faced with the decision of ETSing or deploying to Bosnia with that group, I chose to Get out. I had absolutely no confidence in my Command or my soldiers and was casturated by the Command when it came to the training or discipline of my soldiers. I am not a goose stepping Nazi in my leadership style at all. I am a very laid back and fun loving guy who partied with the troops, had them over to my house, and was on a first name basis off duty with most of them. And although I truly loved my soldiers and loved being a Plt Sargeant, I was too much of a proffesional soldier to be a part of what the 2nd Cav had become. If I had gone to any other unit after leaving Korea I would probably still be in the Army.

    That was almost five years ago so none of those people are still around. With that knowledge comes

    the hope that the Second Cav has regained the luster that it had lost from all the moving of the colors from this Post to that. Being run by Infantry officers and then by the assortment of goofs we had who had no sense of what being a Dragoon is.

    Maybe now it is possible to both “Remember your Regiment” AND “Follow your officers” instead of having to choose between the two.

    Good luck to the new troopers, you have some huge shoes to fill but with the proper attitude and leadership, you’ll do fine.

    TOUJOURS PRET

    Like

  19. To those that don’t understand the role of today’s Regiment, I submit this…in today’s force, there are two real armored cavalry regiments, one heavy and one light. The heavy regiment supports the III Armored Corps. The light supports the XVIII ABN Corps. This is our Regiment. Its lightly equipped to deploy and insert quickly to provide the traditional cavalry missions for rapid deployable XVIII ABN Contingency forces. Soon it will be modernizing to receive the new LAV equipped fighting vehicle, that will turn the Regiment from a light HUMMWV based force, into a medium type regimental force. Today’s force structure just doesn’t permit our force to maintain two heavy cavalry regiments, so although disappointing to many, today’s Regiment provides a vital role in our national security capability, and provides our force with a flexible force projection combined arms package. I’m proud to have serve in our new Regiment, and am equally excited about its future. Tradition of the past, with a promising exciting and prospective future…

    Bill Cojocar

    Former 502d MI, Shadow Troop Commander

    Like

  20. The 2ACR is in my thoughts daily. I served with the Dragoons from 1983-1989. My prayers will be with all of you as you embark on this, your newest test.
    Rick

    Like

  21. Balls to the wall fellow Cav troopers. Remember your Regiment and your training. 2Cav had the "on order" mission to move into Bagdad at the end of the last Gulf war, and we were stopped. Political BS that has cost our country dearly. You guys fly the colors proudly and God bless.

    Like

  22. Good luck 1/2 CAV. Please cover my sons ass. He’s with the 1/2 Marines ( 1st bat 2nd Marines 2nd Mar Div. At least we kept the 1/2 in the family. The 1/2 are the ones that lost 10 of our own in Nasiriyah. I wish so much that I was there.

    Like

  23. Amen Brother. As one of the old timers you are talking about and a veteran of the Regiment I commend you and thank you for your continued service. I remember the days of old when support people worked just as many if not more long hours than us line guys, trying to maintain a Troop worth of vehicles just to keep them ready for immediate deployment. They did the time with us at the Border Camps for 6-8 weeks at a time.

    As for your drill instructors, I am sure they left a lasting impression that you will remember the rest of your life. I remember the day I got promoted to Sergeant, I was the at the Fort Carson personel section to get my ID card changed, and I ran into my old Drill Instructor. It was a completely differant meeting than 3 years earlier during the humid Fort Knox summer of 1982. He took me to the NCO club for my first time.

    Most of the “Old Timers” remember what it was like. We understand that the nobelist of all professions is also the one of the most difficult.

    Keep your head held high and proud. Us “Old Timers” and all of America are very proud of the young people who take up our noble profession.

    You remain in our thoughts and prayers every day.

    Robert Haynes

    Sergeant

    C Troop 1/2 ACR

    Bindlach, FRG

    1983-1984

    Like

  24. Guilty as charged.

    I do not consider myself to be one of the grizzled old-timers of the Army of old; by that I mean soldiers of the Vietnam era and on up until the late eighties and the end of the Cold War. I do not consider myself a new, soft soldier of this so-called Nintedo generation. I am the interim.

    I came into the Army when a boot to the back of the head from a Drill Seargent on a rifle range in basic training was being heavily frowned upon…but not unheard of. My first assignment was in Germany, and my first deployment was to the now-defunct border camps…I was also one of the last to do so. I did my time in SWA; not once, but three times…the most recent being just this past year.

    This is not to say that I was a ground ponder the entire time. I’ve worked (work) in direct support and combat support…working on air defense systems and now on helicopters. I’ve put my time in in training units as well.

    I have seen the good times…when money was plentiful, training lasted forever, and parts were plentiful. And I have seen the bad…working in a position intended for someone three ranks higher than my own, working by myself in an office intended for four people, and begging and pleading for more funds the entire time.

    My generation was considered the push-button Army, otherwise know as the CNN generation. Push a button, a projectile goes down range, and a computer does the rest. At least that is what the “old-timers” say about us.

    Always Ready, Det Cord!

    SGT Slo*****

    “Red_Rock” on Dragoon Base.

    Like

  25. Ok, I have searched this site you gave extensively and cannot find the oval red and white beret flash we wore back then. I lost my beret in a fire a few years back, still have the insiginias but need a flash to put on a beret for old time sake and veterans days etc.
    would appreciate any help I could get on this.
    thanks,
    Toujours pret!
    Jim White

    Like

  26. Good article, but with the advancement of war gaming from HPS (www.hpssims.com)and others, it a little behind the times. Take Fulda Gap-85, by John Tiller that features:

    – One mile hexes and three hour turns.

    – Company and battalion-sized units.

    – Infantry, armor, helicopter, airborne, artillery, and special forces units.

    – Special rules for Chemical Warfare, Artillery-Delivered Mines,

    Electronic Warfare (including jamming and intelligence), and Thermal

    Imaging Sights.

    – Map is over 250 by 150 hexes from the Rhine River in the west to Leipzig

    in the east.

    – Over 20 scenarios ranging from a 10 turn scenario involving the 11th

    Armored Cavalry Regiment vs. the Warsaw Pact to a 160 turn campaign game

    involving American, West German, Canadian, Russian, East German, and

    Polish forces.

    Or "Decisive Action" by Jim Lunsford, not for the faint at heart, "is a modern Division and Corps level simulation that depicts combat with maneuver brigades and battalions along with supporting artillery, airstrikes, electronic warfare, engineer, helicopters, and even pysops units. Units are depicted with official NATO symbology, and US Army official map control measures delineate the battlefield. Scenarios include Germany, SouthWest Asia, and the US Army’s National Training Center."

    And there are more such genere at http://www.shrapnelgames.com.

    SSG Carruthers

    Like

  27. Isaac,
    My birthday is October 25th, so needless to say I have informed my fiancee’ of what I will get for condolences. lol…..
    Toujours Pret
    Twocavtroop

    Like

  28. Dave,
    Your post is outstanding! It’s true Bro, being in the Cav instills a pride, and creates a brotherhood like no other unit can. It’s as much a "state of mind" as anything else.
    Espirit de Corps does not waiver in the Cav, never has, never will.
    Always Ready!
    Jeff
    (Twocavtroop)

    Like

  29. Santa had to be with 1/2 ACR out of Bindlach.
    Christensen Barracks was an old Luftwaffe base which allowed a runway for the sleigh. There was a hanger to take cover in during enclement weather, and the 27 levels (supposed) under the hanger allowed him to store his sleigh in the off season and take practice runs out of the side of ‘The Rock'(supposed launch opening)late at night to keep the Reindeer PT up without being noticed.
    Although it is rumor, it is said that Rudolph was working air traffic control at the airport across the training field. It appears he had a nose for guiding in planes and gliders when fog set in.
    I can also say that while running through the country side on my personal PT, I occassionally saw deer jumping into the corn fields ( to not blow there cover)obviously out working on their cardio.
    As for Santa’s belly, Maisel Hefe Weizen no doubt!

    Merry Christmas everyone.

    Cavdoc

    Like

  30. I had the extreme privledge in seeing one my graduated youth (I am a Youth Pastor) walk up my driveway in Navy blues, just home from boot camp. The privledge is the ability to speak into the lives of young men and women like "Robert" to do the right thing no matter the difficulties. Also I am serving as a local draft board member (Selective Service). Toujours Pret

    Like

  31. How one served and continues to serve is a great question. I am currently a Veterans Services Representative with a VA Regional Office, and I assist veterans with their claims. I am also the S-4 of a Field Artillery Battalion in the WVARNG.

    Our President has asked us to serve in our communities, and serving in our communities, either by volunteering with a service organization, or just checking on a neighbor from time to time is a great way to do a service for our country.

    God Bless The Second Cavalry, and The United States of America.

    CPT Ed Luzadder
    S-4, WVARNG

    Like

  32. Good luck and God Speed…great to see that, even with no tanks or bradleys, we are still respected enought to be called up. Let hope they live up to the high standard we set in the 1st Gulf War.

    Like

  33. Good luck and good hunting, if it comes to that. I haven’t kept up with the going-on of the 2nd since I left long ago, but my heart, prayers, and thoughts are with the Regiment.

    Like

  34. As our forefathers and fellow troopers have done before, the troopers of the Second have been called upon to defend their country. It is with heartfelt wishes that each of them go forward and " “Remember your Regiment and follow your officers."

    Godspeed and a safe journey to each of you, as you write the next chapter in the great and proud history of the Second Armored Cavalry!

    CPT Ed Luzadder

    Like

  35. I know what you guys are going through right now, and my thoughts are with you. I can recall that moment in November ’90, when they interupted regularly scheduled programming to show the news conference with Sec. Cheney. Standing in the day-room at Camp Hof shooting pool with a few of my buddies, I couldn’t believe what I was hearing. I only wish we could have finished the job when we had Saddam’s balls in a vice the first time. We’re all pulling for you, no matter what the leftists in the press say. God be with you!

    Like

  36. As I read the articles posted about this subject, I (as an old soldier/two-time veteran of the Regiment) can understand the point of view of the soldier and leader. I cannot speak of how the regiment pr the Army has changed, as my only experience has been at the Troop/Battery level, and some interactions with the Squadrons I belonged to at the time (C Trp 1/2 1985-1988 and HWB 3/2 1995-1998). I remeber when I went through OSUT at Fort Knox, and how difficult it was at the time. I have also seen the way some of the soldiers are treated today as I continue to visit Fort Knox about four times a year. The training these young soldiers receive is quite a bit different than the training we received in 1984. But, my training was different from that of a tanker or scout in 1941. Unless we place ourselves into that situation all over again, by that, I mean go through the training now, we really don’t know how it is in those training units, but we as leaders do see some of the results of that training. In seeing some of those results is where the stereotypes are formed. As a young Lieutenant, I was told by my battery commander (I am proude to say that I was an elisted tanker, and commissioned into the Field Artillery), “90% of your time will be spent dealing with 10% of your people.” This was true, as those soldiers were the ones we had to deal with on a daily basis. Could this possibly be where we realize training has failed somewhere for these individuals? If so, do we spread that opinion accross a whole generation of soldier? I don’t think so, but I have been guilty of it in the past. To you young soldier, I am sorry to have done that, as I know well the hard work you and others do to make the Regiment strong.As for the opinions of the leadership of the Regiment, I was there at the approximately the same time as the Platoon Sergeant, and within the Squadron, there were some problems. I went to Bosnia, the battery was far removed from the rest of the squadron, and in the four months I was in Bosnia (I too left the active military due to problems with the leadership), the Squadron Commander had to be ordered to visit the battery. He had not been to our unit since our arrival in country, and we had seen the Regimental Commander at least four times during that period. I can understand your frustrations with training, I too had those frustrations in trying to train a platoon of artillery to perform their missions without assistance from the post on down. I also remember the long road march to Fort Chaffee just to have land to train on. As long as the Regiment is used to augment the OPFOR, and JRTC has control over the land assets, training of the units will be a problem. I know this seems a bit disjointed, and I hope I have addressed most of the issues I wanted to cover. In closing, I know the spirit of the American Solder is such that it will rise to the occasion when called upon, just as we did on the Reaction Force at those now non-existant border camps of the Cold War, or the deserts of SWA. We are “One Army”, not an “Army of One”, and we must remember that each day. All soldiers (both young and old), on active duty or not, serve their country for different reasons. My reasons were initially for the college money, and now it is out of a sense of owing something to my contry for giving me the many opportunities I have had over the past 18 years. The reasons we serve do not really matter, but the service one gives to the country does matter. In a world such as the one we have today, I am happy to see our younger soldiers in uniform and protecting not only the right to write and think what we want, but the greatest nation on the face of this earth, The United States of America. God bless all of us serving today, and God Bless America.

    Ed Luzadder

    Like

  37. lookin for Greg Cataldo, ‘Cruity-J, Smitty, Fenstermaker. All platoon buddies from the Rock 1989-1992. If anyone has any idea, please e-mail me. Steve Hardin

    Like

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