Reactivation Ceremony Newspaper article

From:
SECOND UNITED STATES CAVALRY – A HISTORY
Compiled, edited and published by Historical Section, Second Cavalry Association
Maj. A. L. Lambert and Cpt. G. B. Layton, 2d Cavalry

9-reactivationReactivation ceremony for the Second Cavalry Regiment, 15 January 1943. The article from Columbia, SC’s ‘The State’ newspaper reads:

SECOND CAVALRY REACTIVATED AT FORT JACKSON CEREMONIES

Outfit Welcomed By General Simpson Here Yesterday

The name of the Second Cavalry returned to the rolls of the United States Army yesterday morning, when the organization was reactivated at Fort Jackson.

The unit is the proud owner of one of the most glorious histories of any component of the nations military organizations.

Brig. Gen. Boyden E. Beebe, Post Commander of Fort Jackson, arrived shortly before the ceremonies began to welcome the new organization to the post. General Beebe then took his place in the reviewing stand with the Staff of the Regiment to await the arrival of Major General William H. Simpson, Commanding General of the XII Corps, to which the new Second Cavalry was to be attached.

With the arrival of General Simpson at 10:30, the brief but impressive ceremonies got under way. Lieut. Col. Charles H. Reed, Commanding Officer of the new unit, met General Simpson and escorted him to his place in the reviewing stand, and the band sounded “General’s Call”.

Maj. Thomas B. Hargis, Jr., Regimental Adjutant, then read General Orders No. 1, that officially created the new organization. Lieutenant Colonel Reed accepted command of the Regiment, and said that in accepting the name of the organization, they also accepted the responsibility that went with it.

Lieutenant Colonel Reed stressed the two responsibilities that came with the new Second Cavalry. First, the responsibility for living up to the Regimental motto, “Always Ready”; and second, the responsibility for adding to the 29 battle streamers already flying from the Regimental Colors. Said Lieutenant Colonel Reed, “we must not wait for combat, we must seek it. We will be as the old Second in battle – Second To None.”

SIMPSON WELCOMES

Maj. Gen. William H. Simpson, XII Corps Commander, then welcomed the new unit to the Corps. He told them that they were fortunate to be entrusted with the destinies of a Regiment that acquired so many honors and built up such a fine body of tradition during its long career. He stressed the fact that this could only be accomplished by hard and determined effort on the part of everyone in the Regiment, from the lowest basic right up to the commanding officer.

“Our enemies are the toughest and most relentless in the world. And to win we have to train ourselves in mind, body and soul, so that regardless of rain, cold, heat, sand, snow or mud, we are so well trained that the full force of the Regiment can always be thrown against the enemy. There are certain fundamentals I would like to have you bear in mind. These fundamentals are essential, and without them no organization…..[the article is torn off there.]

The caption on the picture reads:
Pictured above in the reviewing stand at the reactivation ceremony of the Second Cavalry at Fort Jackson yesterday morning, are (from left to right): Front row, Maj. Gen. William H. Simpson, XII Corps Commander at Fort Jackson; Brig. Gen. Royden E. Beebe, Post Commander at Fort Jackson; Col. Edward M. Fickett, Commander of the Sixth Cavalry; and Lieut. Col. Charles H. Reed, Commanding Officer of the new Second Cavalry. In the second row are, Maj. Benjamin F. Stahl, Regimental Operations Officer; Maj. James H. Pitman, Regimental Supply Officer; Maj. Thomas B. Hargis, Jr., Regimental Adjutant; and Maj. Stephen W. Benkosky, Regimental Executive Officer. On the right is pictured the color guard of the Second Cavalry holding the national colors and the brilliant, yellow and brown Regimental colors as the Regiment saluted them for the first time. The cluster of ribbons at the top of [the] Regimental colors represent the 29 major engagements in which the unit has participated during its 106 year history.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s